Long and low.  That’s the first impression you get when you walk through the door to Martica’s workspace.  Situated beneath sculptor Alan LeQuire’s Charlotte Avenue studio, only the entrance wall is not below ground.  Windows are not an option on the other three walls, so Martica has raided Home Depot for clamp-on lights that hang from the steel beams across the ceiling.  She uses this flexible system to follow her work flow, repositioning the lamps and even changing the bulbs from cool to warm, depending on the desired result.  Most of the furniture consists of folding tables, also very mobile, so she can take full advantage of the massive square footage, customizing her work flow to the current project.  She wonders aloud if the space might even be too generous at times, making for a long walk to answer the phone or retrieve something she left at the other end.  But then, she catches herself and wisely proclaims that you can never have enough space.  And, particularly at the moment, the length of the studio is allowing her to properly guage how the large pieces in her upcoming installation in the Nashville Airport will look to passers’ by, who are rarely up close to the art there.  Martica’s warren is built to handle just about anything.  An automobile business on the upper floor years ago required super strong beams and subflooring, as well as thick walls.  Her workflow usually begins with a paper model for shadow and perspective study, then a small reference painting, before going for the final piece. She prefers to begin this main stage with the canvas pinned directly to the wall, so that she can press into the surface for the initial sketching/painting and not get the bounce-back typical of stretched canvas.  Martica subscribes to the philosophy expressed by Chuck Close - art is work and you have to treat it with that discipline.  In her own words, she says it this way....

From the Artist:  “There’s no such thing as inspiration.  You have to work.  You show up and you go to work”.

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